Jump to Navigation

Nerd News

Citizen Scientists Working to Document the #SolarEclipse Like Never Before

AdaFruit - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 10:27

After tomorrow’s highly anticipated #SolarEclipse traversing the continental United States, be sure to look for an announcement from The Citizen CATE (Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse) Experiment. They’re working with 68 teams of scientists and citizen scientists at locations spanning 2500 miles, using identical telescopes to digitally capture a continuous stream of the sun’s corona, allowing observation of movement from and within the sun’s corona for 90 minutes. That will make for an incredible timelapse video!

The Citizen CATE (Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse) Experiment aims to capture images of the inner solar corona using a network of more than 60 telescopes operated by citizen scientists, high school groups and universities. CATE is currently a joint project involving volunteers from more than 20 high schools, 20 universities, informal education groups, astronomy clubs across the country, 5 national science research labs and 5 corporate sponsors. The goal of CATE is to produce a scientifically unique data set: high-resolution, rapid cadence white light images of the inner corona for 90 minutes.

For the Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment, scientists, students and volunteers will track the Sun using 68 identical telescopes, software and instrument packages spaced along the 2,500 mile path of totality. Each site will produce more than 1,000 images. This celestial event will begin with a partial solar eclipse and culminate in about 2 minutes of totality. As the Moon’s shadow passes from west to east, each telescope in the Citizen CATE constellation will be ready to take up the observation as the shadow appears on the horizon. The resulting dataset will consist of an unprecedented 90 minutes of continuous, high-resolution, and rapid-cadence images detailing the Sun’s inner corona – a region of the solar atmosphere typically very challenging to image.

Read more.

Categories: Nerd News

Facebook patent reveals more details about its AR glasses

Engadget - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 09:59
Mark Zuckerberg showed off a render of the AR glasses Facebook is working on last year, but he didn't reveal a lot of details about the device. Now, we finally know a bit more about it, thanks to a new patent application filed by members of Oculus' a...
Categories: Nerd News

NASA's Cassini Probe Begins Its 'Grand Finale' Through Saturn's Atmosphere

Slashdot - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 09:24
An anonymous reader quotes Space.com: After orbiting Saturn for more than 13 years, NASA's Cassini spacecraft is getting ready to say goodbye. On Monday (August 14), Cassini made the first of five passes through Saturn's upper atmosphere, kicking off the last phase of the mission's "Grand Finale." After completing those five dives, Cassini will come back around again one last time, plunging into Saturn's atmosphere on September 15. This will be a suicide maneuver: Cassini will burn up in the ringed planet's thick air, turning into a meteor in the Saturn sky... Cassini's radar will be able to look into the atmosphere and see features as small as 16 miles (25 km) wide, about 100 times smaller than what it could see from its usual orbital positions. The Grand Finale will include one final swing by Saturn's largest moon, Titan, on Sept. 11. Titan's gravity will slow Cassini's orbit around Saturn and bend its path to send the spacecraft toward its September 15 encounter with the planet... Cassini will keep sending back data on September 15 until it gets to an altitude where atmospheric density is about twice what it encountered during its final five passes, NASA officials said. At that point, mission controllers will lose contact with the probe because its thrusters won't be able to keep Cassini's antenna pointed toward Earth; there will simply be too much air to push against. The second dip happens this weekend, and NASA has created a special web page tracking Cassini's current location for its final 28 days.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Ben Heck's 'IoT on Wheels'

Engadget - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 08:30
Ben and Felix are taking part in element14's IoT on Wheels design challenge with help from a local electrical engineer, Bob Baddeley, to use ST Microelectronic's Nucleo microcontroller board and Bluetooth module. The team decided to work on an In...
Categories: Nerd News

postmarketOS Pursues A Linux-Based, LTS OS For Android Phones

Slashdot - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 06:19
An anonymous reader quotes Liliputing: Buy an iPhone and you might get 4-5 years of official software updates. Android phones typically get 1-3 years of updates... if they get any updates at all. But there are ways to breathe new life into some older Android phones. If you can unlock the bootloader, you may be able to install a custom ROM like LineageOS and get unofficial software updates for a few more years. The folks behind postmarketOS want to go even further: they're developing a Linux-based alternative to Android with the goal of providing up to 10 years of support for old smartphones... Right now postmarketOS is a touch-friendly operating system based on Alpine Linux that runs on a handful of devices including the Samsung Galaxy Nexus, Google Nexus 4, 5, and 7 (2012), and several other Samsung, HTC, LG, Motorola, and Sony smartphones. There are also ports for some non-Android phones such as the Nokia N900 and work-in-progress builds for the BlackBerry Bolt Touch 9900 and Jolla Phone. Note that when I say the operating system runs on those devices, I basically mean it boots. Some phones only have network access via a USB cable, for instance. None of the devices can actually be used to make phone calls. But here's the cool thing: the developers are hoping to create a single kernel that works with all supported devices, which means that postmarketOS would work a lot like a desktop operating system, allowing you to install the same OS on any smartphone with the proper hardware. One postmarketOS developer complains that Android's architecture "is based on forking (one might as well say copy-pasting) the entire code-base for each and every device and Android version. And then working on that independent, basically instantly incompatible version. Especially adding device-specific drivers plays an important role... Here is the solution: Bend an existing Linux distribution to run on smartphones. Apply all necessary changes as small patches and upstream them, where it makes sense."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Google tests tools that encourage you to pay for news

Engadget - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 05:33
It's no secret that Google and conventional news outlets have a fraught relationship, and that's in no small part due to the problems publishers have turning Google searchers into paying customers. Why subscribe when you just read an article for free...
Categories: Nerd News

Free Outdoor Jukebox in Brooklyn

AdaFruit - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 05:00

There is a jukebox rental and repair store in Brooklyn that has a free jukebox set up for passersby to enjoy. Just as surprising as the free jukebox is the fact that there is a vintage jukebox repair shop! Brokelyn has a nice piece about the shop and its owner:

Terry Swords, the owner of NY Juke, Prospect Heights’ own jukebox rental and repair shop. At the beginning of the summer, Swords set up a coinless Seeburg HF100R in the front his shop. In doing so, he has gone public with his passion, inviting the neighborhood in for a quick song and conversation.

Swords specializes in troubleshooting and fixing the Select-O-Matic 100, the record playing mechanism that sits lit up and encased in glass atop the Seeburg’s faux wood speaker stand. Opposite his workspace no less than ten of these hulking vintage jukeboxes are parked, like used cars on the lot, waiting to be refurbished.

Swords says it’s fascinating to see how people of different generations respond differently to the machines. “For older folks, it seems to be a much more emotional kind of thing. People moved by it, disturbed by it. Whereas younger people are more likely to be fascinated by the mechanics and interested in the music. For really young people, for whom the historical connections don’t mean much – they like music, they dance, they push buttons, they like the sound of the coin down the shoot.”

Read more! and Check out New York Jukebox

Categories: Nerd News

Mirages & Miracles : Augmented Reality Art Installation

AdaFruit - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 04:00

Beautiful work, Via Fastcodesign!

Mirages & Miracles, an installation at France’s Scène Nationale Albi that runs through April 8th. Described as “a delicate coincidence between the virtual and the material,” the art exhibit is filled with sculpture and drawings that, when viewed through an augmented reality headset (we assume the Microsoft Hololens), blossom with an animated layer of media. The show was conceptualized by Claire Bardainne and Adrien Mondot, but it took a considerable team of digital and analog creators to bring it to life.

Watching the video walkthrough featured on Prosthetic Knowledge, it can be hard to pinpoint why its pieces are so compelling–as with any piece of art that takes you by surprise. But view the clip and you’ll see what I mean. Some sketches grow long, hairy tendrils. Others extend off their canvases like bats swarming through the studio. And in my favorite moment, a shadow climbs from a pointillist sketch, dropping inky splotches in its wake. The effect is that of a drawing that’s in fact drawing itself in front of your eyes.

Why are these pieces so fresh in an industry overflowing with AR gimmicks? I can’t help but wonder if it’s the mix of organic materials–rocks, hair, and even inks–and the pixels themselves. We’re used to seeing AR pop up from a QR code. Alternatively, we’ve seen AR that can annotate objects in our environment, like a projector that casts a digital interface onto your kitchen table from above.

But in Mirages & Miracles, it’s handmade art that comes to life. And so it feels bespoke rather than mass produced and digitized. Fast forward five or 10 years, and it’s easy to imagine this marriage of Etsy-style prints and fashions being packaged with a whole secondary layer of augmented beauty. Because today we may weave in yarn. But tomorrow we’ll be able to lace every thread with pixels, too.

See more!

Categories: Nerd News

What Happened To Winamp?

Slashdot - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 03:01
Winamp was released more than 20 years ago, and last week marked the 15th anniversary of the release of Winamp3. An anonymous Slashdot reader tries to explain what finally happened to Winamp: AOL planned to discontinue Winamp in November of 2013, but instead sold it to the Belgian online radio service Radionomy. The last update on Winamp's Twitter account was September of 2015, though it announced that they were looking for a new senior C++ developer. Then in December of 2015 Vivendi Group became that company's majority shareholder, stirring hopes that the company might one day launch a revamped version of the classic mp3 player from 1997. So did they? Radionomy's Winamp page is still showing download links -- though they now lead instead to a forum post which says "code licensed to the previous owner" is being removed or replaced. But that post has been updated five times -- as recently as last October -- with "info about the next Winamp release," each linking to a thread on Winamp's forums which offer tantalizing glimpses into a still-ongoing development process. And last October a Winamp dev posted on Twitter that "a Winamp 5.8 public beta release could be imminent," while the web page at Winamp.com still says "There's more coming soon," with a background image of a llama. "There's no reason that Winamp couldn't be in the position that iTunes is in today if not for a few layers of mismanagement by AOL that started immediately upon acquisition," their first general manager told Ars Technica in 2012. (Winamp's developers had been earning $100,000 a month just from $10 shareware checks before AOL acquired the company in 1999 for $100 million.) In May TechRadar wrote that Winamp "is still a great media player...but it now relies on third-party extensions to add features found as standard in more modern players." I still remember all the visualizations and custom skins -- but does this bring back any memories for anyone else? Leave your thoughts in the comments. And what mp3-playing software are you using today?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

From James Baldwin to Susan Sontag, Listen to Recordings from PEN America’s Vast Archive

AdaFruit - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 02:10

via HYPERALLERGIC

The PEN America Digital Archive launched on July 26 with over 1,500 hours of audio and video material newly accessible to the public, from theinaugural visit of Pablo Neruda to the United States, to Haruki Murakami’s first public speaking event. The archive chronicles 50 years of PEN America’s programming on literature and freedom of expression, featuring the voices of authors and advocates like Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, Susan Sontag, and Salman Rushdie.

On its site, PEN shared the origin story of the archive, adapted from text by Antonio Aiello, the former web editor and content director of PEN America who spearheaded the project. As Aiello describes, it was inspired by a 2011 visit to the PEN archives at Princeton University, where researchers found this material so fragile that it was unable to be heard:

“Arriving at the small, sun-filled reading room, eager to dive into recordings featuring the likes of Pablo Neruda, Susan Sontag, Toni Morrison, James Baldwin, and many more, our staff met a dead end: Princeton denied us access to the recordings. A loud argument ensued. Our staff insisted on seeing the collection; both the archivist and the curator said no. Our staff begged. The curator stood his ground. The recordings had been deemed so vulnerable that a single spin of a record through a player could cause irreparable damage that would render the recording unusable.”

Hear and learn more!

Categories: Nerd News

MIT Technology Review’s 2:22 Guide to Understand CRISPR

AdaFruit - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 01:00

From MIT Technology Review on YouTube:

Is CRISPR really such a big deal? Put simply: Yes. Here’s why, and the nitty gritty of how the gene-editing tool works.

See more

Categories: Nerd News

Australian courts order ISPs to block 59 pirate websites

Engadget - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 00:51
Australian authorities will make it much harder to keep up with the latest on Game of Thrones. They're expected to crack down hard on dozens of pirate websites that serve unauthorized movies and TV shows within the next couple of weeks. That's becaus...
Categories: Nerd News

Wise Company 104-Serving Variety Bucket

Woot Blog - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 00:00

In a world gone mad, a bucket of food looks sane.

What if that day comes. What if your worst nightmare becomes reality. What if the movies were right all along. What if you're down there for days, which turn into weeks, which turn into months. At the very least, you want some food on the shelves, right? Also maybe put some money into drone-delivered pizza and you can sell to the other survivors.

Categories: Nerd News

Future Imperfect: The Uncanny in Science Fiction – a Film Series @MoMAFilm #SciFiSunday

AdaFruit - Sun, 08/20/2017 - 00:00

Showing at MoMA now through the end of August!

Imagine a science-fiction film series with no space travel, no alien invasions or monsters, and no visions of the distant future. Imagine instead a dazzling array of science-fiction films entirely taking place on Earth and in the present (or near present).

Science fiction, at least in the movies, essentially boils down to two questions: Are “they” coming to kill us or to save us? And, what does it mean to be human? Presented in association with the Berlinale and the Deutsche Kinemathek-Museum für Film und Fernsehen, this exhibition of 70 science-fiction films from all over the world—22 countries including the United States, the Soviet Union, China, India, Cameroon, Mexico, and beyond—explores the second question: our humanity in all its miraculous, uncanny, and perhaps ultimately unknowable aspects. Since the dawn of cinema, filmmakers as diverse as Kathryn Bigelow, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Kinji Fukasaku, Jean-Luc Godard, Barry Jenkins, Georges Méliès, Michael Snow, Alexander Sokurov, and Steven Spielberg have explored ideas of memory and consciousness; thought, sensation, and desire; self and other; nature and nurture; time and space; and love and death. Their films, lying at the nexus of art, philosophy, and science, occupy a twilight zone bounded only by the imagination, where “humanness” remains an enchanting enigma.

Read more.

Categories: Nerd News

After 15 Years, Maine's Laptops-in-Schools Initiative Fails To Raise Test Scores

Slashdot - Sat, 08/19/2017 - 23:09
For years Maine has been offering laptops to high school students -- but is it doing more harm than good? An anonymous reader writes: One high school student says "We hardly ever use paper," while another student "says he couldn't imagine social studies class without his laptop and Internet connection. 'I don't think I could do it, honestly... I don't want to look at a newspaper. I don't even know where to get a newspaper!'" But then the reporter visits a political science teacher who "learned what a lot of teachers, researchers and policymakers in Maine have come to realize over the past 15 years: You can't just put a computer in a kid's hand and expect it to change learning." "Research has shown that 'one-to-one' programs, meaning one student one computer, implemented the right way, increase student learning in subjects like writing, math and science. Those results have prompted other states, like Utah and Nevada, to look at implementing their own one-to-one programs in recent years. Yet, after a decade and a half, and at a cost of about $12 million annually (around one percent of the state's education budget), Maine has yet to see any measurable increases on statewide standardized test scores." The article notes that Maine de-emphasized teacher training which could've produced better results. One education policy researcher "says this has created a new kind of divide in Maine. Students in larger schools, with more resources, have learned how to use their laptops in more creative ways. But in Maine's higher poverty and more rural schools, many students are still just using programs like PowerPoint and Microsoft Word."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

5 Tips For Surviving a Dinosaur Disaster #SciFiSunday

AdaFruit - Sat, 08/19/2017 - 23:00

Charmingly cheeky piece from Brian Switek up on Tor.com.

It’s a beautiful day at Jurassic World. The sun is shining. The Archaeopteryx are singing. The only annoyance is the seemingly endless visitors trying to take a selfie with the Baryonyx in the background, but it’s hard to begrudge them that. It’s hard to be unhappy when surrounded by dinosaurs.

But then the screaming starts. At first you think some kid got a little nervous about seeing Triceratops in the flesh. Dinosaurs can be more than a little intimidating up close. But you know that’s not right. There’s too much depth to the cry, and it’s getting louder. By the time you turn around to see where all the commotion is coming from, the Tyrannosaurus has already stepping into view from behind the gift shop with half a tourist sliding down its jaws, tatters of Hawaiian shirt dangling between its teeth. Damn.

Read more.

Categories: Nerd News

Sorry, Amazon is canceling your 'free' Echo Dot

Engadget - Sat, 08/19/2017 - 22:04
If you thought that free Echo Dot was too good to be true... well, you were right. Amazon is cancelling zero-cost orders for the tiny smart speaker, informing buyers that a "technical error" was responsible for the surprise Audible discount. You won'...
Categories: Nerd News

Ask Slashdot: What Would You Pay To See Open Sourced?

Slashdot - Sat, 08/19/2017 - 21:04
jbrase writes: It's in the interest of the open-source community to make open-source development as profitable as possible. One potential means of making money from open source is crowdfunding, [but] proprietary vendors aren't likely to be enthusastic about using their flagship product to try out a relatively untested business model. Crowdfunding the open source release of legacy technologies of historical significance could provide a low-risk way for vendors to experiment with making money by crowdfunding: The product has already turned them a profit. With that, I'd like to ask Slashdot readers, what would you pay to see open sourced? Slashdot reader jonwil left a comment suggesting old games ("where the game is no longer being developed/worked on and where the engine/tech is no longer being used for anything"). But the sky's the limit here, so leave your own best answers in the comments. What would you pay to see open sourced?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

'Mass Effect: Andromeda' won't get more single-player content

Engadget - Sat, 08/19/2017 - 20:32
BioWare vowed to fix Mass Effect: Andromeda's numerous teething troubles shortly after launch, but there's apparently only so much it can do. The studio has revealed that its 1.10 patch is the last single-player update for the game -- in a confirmat...
Categories: Nerd News

FBI Warns US Private Sector To Cut Ties With Kaspersky

Slashdot - Sat, 08/19/2017 - 18:59
An anonymous reader quotes CyberScoop: The FBI has been briefing private sector companies on intelligence claiming to show that the Moscow-based cybersecurity company Kaspersky Lab is an unacceptable threat to national security, current and former senior U.S. officials familiar with the matter tell CyberScoop... The FBI's goal is to have U.S. firms push Kaspersky out of their systems as soon as possible or refrain from using them in new products or other efforts, the current and former officials say. The FBI's counterintelligence section has been giving briefings since beginning of the year on a priority basis, prioritizing companies in the energy sector and those that use industrial control (ICS) and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems. In light of successive cyberattacks against the electric grid in Ukraine, the FBI has focused on this sector due to the critical infrastructure designation assigned to it by the Department of Homeland Security... The U.S. government's actions come as Russia is engaged in its own push to stamp American tech giants like Microsoft out of that country's systems. Meanwhile Bloomberg Businessweek claims to have seen emails which "show that Kaspersky Lab has maintained a much closer working relationship with Russia's main intelligence agency, the FSB, than it has publicly admitted" -- and that Kaspersky Lab "confirmed the emails are authentic." Kaspersky Lab told ZDNet they have not confirmed the emails' authenticity. A representative for Kaspersky Lab says that the company does not have "inappropriate" ties with any government, adding that "the company does regularly work with governments and law enforcement agencies around the world with the sole purpose of fighting cybercrime."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Pages

Subscribe to http://dagobah-system.com aggregator - Nerd News


Main menu 2

Dracula