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Starz app streams 'American Gods' to your Samsung Smart TV

Engadget - 22 hours 2 min ago
If you've wanted to watch the likes of American Gods or Outlander with little more than an internet connection and your TV, you no longer need one of Sony's sets to make it happen. Starz has launched its streaming app on Samsung Smart TVs, bringing...
Categories: Nerd News

Dyson V6 Absolute Cordless Vacuum

Woot Blog - 22 hours 19 min ago

The official flower of May is Lily Of The Valley. There. Now you can talk about something at your next cocktail party.

You are the deal hunter, hidden in your deal blind. These deals are the herd, galloping past you one at a time, all day. Consider, deal hunter. Find the most appealing deal you can call your prey, than pounce on it like a hungry kitty. But be warned! Like the kitty, you must time your leap correctly! Otherwise you'll miss out.

Categories: Nerd News

Woot This Week

Woot Blog - 22 hours 20 min ago

Welcome to Woot This Week, where every week we count down five of the coolest/weirdest/craziest items currently for sale on Woot!

And now, without further ado, the top five cool things I found on Woot this week:

5. Manly Aprons, $13.99

4. Cookbooks, $9.99

3. Kids’ Bath Bombs, $12.99

2. Pet Beds, $21.99

1. Floats by Floatie Kings, $29.99

Those are my finds for this week, friends! Did you find something weird and cool on Woot this week? Don't be selfish! Post it here!

Categories: Nerd News

$5 Shipping Wed, May 24

Woot Blog - 22 hours 20 min ago
MAY 24th, PAY $5 ONCE FOR ALL YOUR SHIPPING NEEDS

Here's the deal: (1) You pay your $5 shipping once for your first purchase on May 24th. (2) All your shipping is FREE through the end of the day on May 24th. That's free standard shipping after your first order for anything except Wine.Woot and international Shirt.Woot orders through 11:59pm CST on Wednesday, May 24th, 2017. No matter how many times you buy. So come back multiple times a day, or multiple times per second.

Categories: Nerd News

Facebook's latest journalism fix connects users with local news

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 22:52
Earlier this year, Mark Zuckerberg and company announced the Facebook Journalism Project -- an initiative to repair the social network's reputation with journalists and help fight the spread of fake news. The project already introduced curated news d...
Categories: Nerd News

Researchers Find Dozens of Genes Associated With Measures of Intelligence

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 22:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: We don't know a lot about the biological basis of our mental abilities -- we can't even consistently agree on how best to test them -- but a few things seem clear. One is that performance on a number of standardized tests that purport to measure intelligence tends to correlate with outcomes we'd associate with intelligence, like educational achievement. A second is that this performance seems to have a large genetic component. But initial studies clearly indicated that the effect of any individual gene on intelligence is small. As a result, the first genetics studies found very little, since you needed to look at a large number of people in order to see these small effects. Now, a new study has combined much of the previous work and has turned up 40 new genetic regions associated with intelligence test scores. But again, the effect of any individual gene is pretty minor. The team behind the new work took advantage of open data to pull together information from 13 different studies, which cumulatively looked through the genomes of over 78,000 individuals. While those individuals had been given a variety of tests, the authors focused on measures of general intelligence or fluid intelligence (the two seem to measure similar things). The genomes of these individuals had been scanned for single base pair differences, allowing the authors to look for correlations between regions of the genome and test scores. Two separate analyses were done. The first simply looked at each base difference individually. That turned up 336 individual bases, which clustered into 22 different genes. Half of these had not been associated with intelligence previously. To provide a separate validation of these results, the authors did a similar analysis with educational achievement. They found that nearly all of the sites they identified also correlated with that. In a second analysis, the authors tracked base differences that cluster in a single gene. Since there are more markers for each gene, this tends to be a more sensitive way of looking for effects. And in fact, it produced 47 genes associated with the intelligence test scores. Seventeen of those had been identified in the earlier analysis, which brought the total genes identified to 52, only 12 of which had been previously associated with intelligence test scores.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Daimler bets big on luxury EVs with new battery plant

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 21:21
Mercedes-Benz owner Daimler is incredibly bullish about electric vehicles. So much so that it's recently broken ground on another battery plant in Germany, a stone's throw from its existing facility. It'll begin operating around June next year and so...
Categories: Nerd News

When AI Botches Your Medical Diagnosis, Who's To Blame?

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 20:25
Robert Hart has posed an interested question in his report on Quartz: When artificial intelligence botches your medical diagnosis, who's to blame? Do you blame the AI, designer or organization? It's just one of many questions popping up and starting to be seriously pondered by experts as artificial intelligence and automation continue to become more entwined into our daily lives. From the report: The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis? Medical error is currently the third leading cause of death in the U.S., and as many as one in six patients in the British NHS receive incorrect diagnoses. With statistics like these, it's unsurprising that researchers at Johns Hopkins University believe diagnostic errors to be "the next frontier for patient safety." Of course, there are downsides. AI raises profound questions regarding medical responsibility. Usually when something goes wrong, it is a fairly straightforward matter to determine blame. A misdiagnosis, for instance, would likely be the responsibility of the presiding physician. A faulty machine or medical device that harms a patient would likely see the manufacturer or operator held to account. What would this mean for an AI?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Google's $5,000 4K digital whiteboard goes on sale

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 20:18
It only took half a year, but Google's first take on a digital whiteboard is finally available. Google has started selling the Jamboard in the US for $4,999 plus $600 per year for management and support ($300 if you buy one by the end of September)....
Categories: Nerd News

Republicans Want To Leave You Voicemail -- Without Ever Ringing Your Cellphone

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 20:05
bricko quotes a report from Recode: The GOP's leading campaign and fundraising arm, the Republican National Committee, has quietly thrown its support behind a proposal at the Federal Communications Commission that would pave the way for marketers to auto-dial consumers' cellphones and leave them prerecorded voicemail messages -- all without ever causing their devices to ring. Under current federal law, telemarketers and others, like political groups, aren't allowed to launch robocall campaigns targeting cellphones unless they first obtain a consumer's written consent. But businesses stress that it's a different story when it comes to "ringless voicemail" -- because it technically doesn't qualify as a phone call in the first place. In their eyes, that means they shouldn't need a customer or voter's permission if they want to auto-dial mobile voicemail inboxes in bulk pre-made messages about a political candidate, product or cause. And they want the FCC to rule, once and for all, that they're in the clear. Their argument, however, has drawn immense opposition from consumer advocates.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Open19 Launches Open Hardware Project Targeting Edge Computing

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 19:35
miller60 writes: The Open19 Foundation launched today, positioning its open hardware designs as a platform for edge computing, and an alternative to the Open Compute Project and hyperscale designs. The Open19 designs were created by the data center team at LinkedIn, citing its focus on a 19-inch rack and licensing terms that it said allow participants better control over their intellectual property. Open Compute develops the 21-inch Open Rack but is also supporting several designs for 19-inch racks, including the Project Olympus concept contributed by Microsoft, LinkedIn's parent company. According to Fortune, the Open19 Foundation is a new group established by LinkedIn, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, and General Electric. Its purpose is to make it easier for businesses to buy data center hardware and to encourage companies to build data center hardware more uniformly so that it fits in standardized data racks. The racks themselves are used by businesses to house their computing gear, such as servers and routers. The 19-inch rack is the most commonly used.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Warby Parker has an app that checks your eyes at home

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 19:14
Usually, completing a vision test for new glasses requires a trip to the optometrist and the glasses store. Newly announced technology could change that, however. Warby Parker, which started out as a try-before-you-buy mail-order eyeglasses company,...
Categories: Nerd News

Google Following Your Offline Credit Card Spending To Tell Advertisers If Their Ads Work

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 19:05
One of the new tools Google has announced for its advertisers today promises to tie your offline credit card data together with all your online viewing to tell advertisers exactly what's working as they try to target you and your wallet. Consumerist reports: That return, for decades, was hard to measure in all but the most vaguely correlative of ways. Did people buy your product after seeing your TV ad? After seeing your billboard? On a whim after seeing neither? Who knows! But in the age of highly targeted, algorithmic advertising, the landscape is completely different. The apps on your phone know what you looked at and when, and can tie that in to what you see on other devices you're also logged into their services on (like your work computer). Meanwhile, you're leaving tracks out in the physical world -- not only the location history of your phone, but also the trail of payments you leave behind you if you pay with a credit card, debit card, or app (as millions of us do). Google also introduced some offline measurements to its online tool suite back in 2014, when it started using phone location data to try to match store visit location data to digital ad views. But a store doesn't make any money when you simply walk into it; you need to buy something. So Google's tracking that very granularly now, too. "In the coming months, we'll be rolling out store sales measurement at the device and campaign levels. This will allow you to measure in-store revenue in addition to the store visits delivered by your Search and Shopping ads," Google explains to advertisers. That's very literally a collection of spending data matched to the people who spent it, matched in turn to people who saw ads.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

US sues Fiat Chrysler over diesel emissions cheating

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 18:39
Volkswagen definitely won't be the only major automaker hauled into court for cheating on diesel emissions tests in recent years. In the wake of EPA accusations from January, the US Department of Justice has sued Fiat Chrysler for allegedly using a...
Categories: Nerd News

Uber Plans Millions In Back Pay After Shorting NYC Drivers

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 18:20
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Uber Technologies Inc. said it underpaid its New York City drivers by improperly calculating the company's share of passenger fares, and will pay out an average of $900 per driver in restitution, costing tens of millions of dollars. The back pay could run at least $45 million, based on the approximately 50,000 drivers the Independent Drivers Guild says work in New York City. The ride-hailing company has previously misled drivers about how much they could make and miscalculated fares. In this case, Uber was taking its cut of fares based on the pretax sum, instead of after taxes and fees as stated in its terms of service. The issue was also raised in a lawsuit against San Francisco-based Uber filed by the New York Taxi Workers Alliance. In March, Uber acknowledged that it had underestimated drivers' pay in Philadelphia by millions of dollars. "We are committed to paying every driver every penny they are owed -- plus interest -- as quickly as possible," Rachel Holt, Uber's head of U.S. operations, said in a statement. "We are working hard to regain driver trust, and that means being transparent, sticking to our word, and making the Uber experience better from end to end."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

Google will track your shopping trips to prove its ads work

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 17:59
First, Google followed you to the store using location data, much like Foursquare. Then its launched its Express shopping service. Now, it will track billions of credit and debit card transactions in an even bigger effort to prove its online ads push...
Categories: Nerd News

FCC Won't Punish Stephen Colbert For Controversial Trump Insult

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 17:40
Earlier this month, the FCC said it would look into complaints made against The Late Show host Stephen Colbert over a homophobic joke he made about President Donald Trump. Well, it turns out the FCC is not going to levy a fine against the comedian for using the word "cock" on late-night network television, reports The Verge. From the report: "Consistent with standard operating procedure, the FCC's Enforcement Bureau has reviewed the complaints and the material that was the subject of these complaints," reads the FCC's statement, according to Variety. "The Bureau has concluded that there was nothing actionable under the FCC's rules." Helping Colbert's case was the fact that the broadcast, time delayed for incidents like these, bleeped out the questionable word and also blurred the host's mouth as he was saying it. The FCC has broad authority to regulate what can and cannot be broadcast based on legal precedent regarding obscenity laws. Yet looser rules apply during the hours of 10PM and 6AM ET, when Colbert's show airs. So it would appear that the ample self-censorship on behalf of CBS saved the program from a guilty verdict in this case.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

IKEA's affordable smart lights will dim with your voice

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 17:34
Last month, IKEA launched its own line of low-cost smart lighting, called TRÅDFRI, and up until now, users have had to rely on a remote control or a proprietary app to use the product. But no longer. Today, the Swedish retailer announced that...
Categories: Nerd News

CBS greenlights another James Corden show... on Snapchat

Engadget - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 17:09
James Corden's viral-friendly Carpool Karaoke videos have given The Late Late Show exposure well beyond it's timeslot. Now CBS wants to squeeze out a little more of Corden's magic by giving the singing Brit his own (fictional) competitive reality sho...
Categories: Nerd News

DJI Threatens To 'Brick' Its Copters Unless Owners Agree To Share Their Details

Slashdot - Tue, 05/23/2017 - 17:00
schwit1 quotes a report from The Sun: A top drone manufacturer has warned that customers' expensive gadgets will be crippled if they don't register their details on its website. DJI drones -- which cost between $1,200 and $3,000 -- won't be able to fly to their full potential or beam back footage if their owners don't sign up next week, the company warned. Those who splashed out for the snazzy gadgets will find they are limited to a teensy 50m radius and it won't be flying higher than 30m if they don't play ball. The company said on its website: "DJI will soon introduce a new application activation process for international customers. This new step, to take effect at the end of next week, ensures you will use the correct set of geospatial information and flight functions for your aircraft, as determined by your geographical location and user profile. All existing flight safety limitations, such as geofencing boundaries and altitude limits, remain the same. Even if you have registered when activating your aircraft upon purchase, you will have to log in once when you update the new version of DJI GO or GO 4 App."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Nerd News

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