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Marvel Joins Comixology's All-You-Can Read Subscription Service

Gizmodo - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 08:00

When Amazon and Comixology first announced Unlimited last year, two of the biggest comics publishers around were conspicuously absent from the list of comics available in the read-what-you-want service: Marvel and DC. But today, one of them has finally gotten on board.

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Categories: Nerd News

Senate Republicans Introduce Anti-Net Neutrality Legislation

Slashdot - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 08:00
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Hill: Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) introduced a bill Monday to nullify the Federal Communications Commission's net neutrality rules. "Few areas of our economy have been as dynamic and innovative as the internet," Lee said in a statement. "But now this engine of growth is threatened by the Federal Communications Commission's 2015 Open Internet Order, which would put federal bureaucrats in charge of engineering the Internet's infrastructure." Sens. John Cornyn (R-Texas), Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), Ted Cruz (R-Texas), Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), Rand Paul (R-Ky.), Thom Tillis (R-N.C.), Ben Sasse (R-Neb.), and James Inhofe (R-Okla.) co-sponsored Lee's bill. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai introduced his own plan last week to curb significant portions of the 2015 net neutrality rules that Lee's bill aims to abolish. Pai's more specific tack is focused on moving the regulatory jurisdiction of broadband providers back to the Federal Trade Commission, instead of the FCC, which currently regulates them.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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Back In Stock: This $70 Harmony Remote Includes The All-Powerful Harmony Hub

Gizmodo - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 07:51

$70 for a Logitech Harmony remote is a great deal on its face, but the real reason to buy this model is the included Harmony Home Hub.

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The Best Lightning Cables Are Back On Sale

Gizmodo - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 07:34

Anker’s PowerLine Lightning cables have long been our readers’ favorites, and two different models are on sale today on Amazon.

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In Ethiopia, pirate movie kiosks hide in plain sight

Engadget - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 07:31
With the rise of cheap, easy and legal streaming services, actually pirating a movie or song seems like way too much effort. But in those places where high-speed internet may not be as prevalent, and those services are too pricey, other methods are r...
Categories: Nerd News

Ulla-Stina Wikander converts objects from the 70’s into cross stitched pieces of art! #ArtTuesday

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 07:00

Via Cultura Inquieta

(translated from Spanish)

All objects deserve an opportunity, or more than one. Thats what Ulla Stina Wikander thought when she decided to recycle objects from the 70’s into beautiful pieces of crochet and cross stitch art. Long live imagination and second chances!

See more!

Every Tuesday is Art Tuesday here at Adafruit! Today we celebrate artists and makers from around the world who are designing innovative and creative works using technology, science, electronics and more. You can start your own career as an artist today with Adafruit’s conductive paints, art-related electronics kits, LEDs, wearables, 3D printers and more! Make your most imaginative designs come to life with our helpful tutorials from the Adafruit Learning System. And don’t forget to check in every Art Tuesday for more artistic inspiration here on the Adafruit Blog!
Categories: Nerd News

Scientists Just Found a Completely New Kind of Symbiotic Relationship

Gizmodo - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 07:00

In a scientific first, researchers have discovered a bizarre inter-species relationship in which salamanders and algae cozy up together to share cells. Scientists aren’t entirely sure why these two very different organisms have adopted such an intimate arrangement, but the discovery could represent a completely new…

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Categories: Nerd News

Get ready for more AR apps for Google's Tango

Engadget - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 06:25
With Google riding high on the back of Pixel's success, it's easy to forget that 2016 also saw one of the weirder releases from the company - Google Tango. Putting 3D-mapping tech into a smartphone for the first time, the Tango-enabled Lenovo Phab2 P...
Categories: Nerd News

Mario-Themed Bar Will Warp You Straight Into the Mushroom Kingdom

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 06:00

via My Modern Met

The love and nostalgia for the Super Mario Brothers franchise is strong. From an immersive Mario-inspired Airbnb to playful kitchen tools, it seems like we’ll never tire of the beloved video game classic. So, it’s no wonder that a Mario bar in Washington, D.C. is so popular that it takes two hours just to get in. The video game-themed homage is technically a pop-up bar inside the night spot Mockingbird Hill, and it pulls out all the stops to make you feel like you’re living inside of the Nintendo dream world.

 

The decor incorporates, among other things, animatronics that add a sense of whimsy to the otherwise contemporary space. Petey Piranha menacingly appears from green warp tubes that hang from the ceiling, alongside glowing mystery boxes, fluffy clouds, and the best that the Mushroom Kingdom has to offer. The walls, too, are lined with the iconic green tubes and murals depicting different Mario moments.

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Back For Wedding Season: The Best Price Ever On Your Favorite Custom Suits [Exclusive]

Gizmodo - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 06:00

You voted Indochino your favorite custom clothing company by a wide margin, and this week you can dress yourself in one of their premium suits for just $350. Use promo code KINJA.

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Time Travel Tuesday #timetravel a look back at the Adafruit, maker, science, technology and engineering world

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 05:00

1947 – James Dyson, English businessman, founded the Dyson Company is born.

Sir James Dyson is a British inventor, industrial designer and founder of the Dyson company. He is best known as the inventor of the Dual Cyclone bagless vacuum cleaner, which works on the principle of cyclonic separation. According to the Sunday Times Rich List 2016, his net worth is £5 billion, up from £3 billion in 2013.

Read more.

1952 – The world’s first ever jet airliner, the De Havilland Comet 1 makes its maiden flight, from London to Johannesburg.

The de Havilland DH 106 Comet was the world’s first commercial jetliner. Developed and manufactured by de Havilland at its Hatfield Aerodrome, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom headquarters, the Comet 1 prototype first flew on 27 July 1949. It featured an aerodynamically clean design with four de Havilland Ghost turbojet engines buried in the wings, a pressurised fuselage, and large square windows. For the era, it offered a relatively quiet, comfortable passenger cabin and showed signs of being a commercial success at its 1952 debut.

A year after entering commercial service, the Comets began suffering problems, with three of them breaking up during mid-flight in well-publicised accidents. Two of these were found to be caused by catastrophic failure resulting from metal fatigue in the airframes, not well understood at the time. The other one was due to overstressing of the airframe during flight through severe weather. The Comet was withdrawn from service and extensively tested to discover the causes of the fatigue failures. Design flaws, including dangerous stresses at the corners of the square windows and installation methods, were ultimately identified. As a result, the Comet was extensively redesigned with oval windows, structural reinforcement, and other changes. Rival manufacturers meanwhile heeded the lessons learned from the Comet while developing their own aircraft.

Read more.

2000 – President Bill Clinton announces that accurate GPS access would no longer be restricted to the United States military.

The Global Positioning System (GPS), originally Navstar GPS, is a space-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States Air Force. It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver anywhere on or near the Earth where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites.

The GPS system does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS positioning information. The GPS system provides critical positioning capabilities to military, civil, and commercial users around the world. The United States government created the system, maintains it, and makes it freely accessible to anyone with a GPS receiver. However, the US government can selectively deny access to the system, as happened to the Indian military in 1999 during the Kargil War.

The GPS project was launched in the United States in 1973 to overcome the limitations of previous navigation systems,[5] integrating ideas from several predecessors, including a number of classified engineering design studies from the 1960s. The U.S. Department of Defense developed the system, which originally used 24 satellites. It became fully operational in 1995. Roger L. Easton of the Naval Research Laboratory, Ivan A. Getting of The Aerospace Corporation, and Bradford Parkinson of the Applied Physics Laboratory are credited with inventing it.

Advances in technology and new demands on the existing system have now led to efforts to modernize the GPS and implement the next generation of GPS Block IIIA satellites and Next Generation Operational Control System (OCX). Announcements from Vice President Al Gore and the White House in 1998 initiated these changes. In 2000, the U.S. Congress authorized the modernization effort, GPS III.

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2014 – Circuit Playground: C is for Capacitor

Join Adabot and meet up with Cappy in Circuit Playground!

Learn all about how a capacitor works and how it’s used in a variety electronic devices!

And in case you missed them, be sure to check out the previous episodes of Circuit Playground.

Categories: Nerd News

A Plague of Digital Rats for Your Desktop #ArtTuesday

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 03:02

via HYPERALLERGIC

“DESCENT” is a downloadable, digital artwork that’s inspired by both Bruegel and the Black Death.

When you launch the “DESCENT” .exe file on your desktop, a malware invasion of rats begins. At first only a few appear as ominous “RAT” image files. Then, as the glitchy static grows more intense, with a bouncing movement reminiscent of pestilent fleas, the steeple of a church emerges from the pixelated forms. Soon the rats become a plague. The human figures wandering the strange, fluctuating landscape undergo a cycle of life and death.

The digital artwork was created by artist Peter Burr and programmer Mark Fingerhut, with music by Forma. While the PC program is available for free download through the internet-based collective Undervolt & Co., you can also view “DESCENT” in the video below, which was published on Vimeo last month and recently shared on Prosthetic Knowledge. Watching at full screen is recommended for a simulation of the desktop experience.


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Categories: Nerd News

The Dynamic Brain Drawings of the Father of Modern Neuroscience #ArtTuesday

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 02:00

via HYPERALLERGIC

Santiago Ramón y Cajal wanted to be an artist and photographer, but his physician father encouraged him to go into the medical profession. Even working in neuroscience, the Spaniard’s interest in visual art ended up proving essential, and his illustrations continue to appear in textbooks and medical literature. The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal, out now from Abrams Books, accompanies a traveling exhibition that opened this January at the Weisman Art Museum at the University of Minnesota and was organized with the Cajal Institute in Madrid, Spain. Both the book and the show concentrate on 80 visualizations of the human brain by Cajal, often ordained the “father of modern neuroscience.”

Cajal was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1906, yet he remains obscure compared to 19th-century scientists such as Charles Darwin and Louis Pasteur. Neuroscientist Larry W. Swanson writes in a book essay that this may be “because there is no simple means to encapsulate how Cajal and his contemporaries explained and illustrated the workings of the brain as a biological network in an entirely new way, a way that remains foundational to neuroscientists today.” Indeed, not every viewer will understand how he was able to discern the information flow of neurons in the retina just by studying specimens through a microscope, but with their clean lines and directional indications, the illustrations are visually striking.

From Santiago Ramón y Cajal’s autobiography

Like the entomologist in pursuit of brightly colored butterflies, my attention hunted, in the flower garden of the gray matter [the cerebral cortex], cells with delicate and elegant forms, the mysterious butterflies of the soul, the beating of whose wings may someday — who knows? — clarify the secret of mental life.

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Ellison S. Onizuka: First Asian American and the First Person of Japanese Ancestry to Reach Space #AsianPacificAmericanHeritageMonth

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 01:30

Hawaii born Ellison S. Onizuka was the first Asian American and the first person of Japanese ancestry to reach space, Via NBC

Ellison Onizuka was a local boy who made it to space.

Born in the community of Kealakekua in rural Kona on the Big Island of Hawaii, Onizuka grew up playing under coffee trees and as a member of the Boy Scouts and the FFA.

He would eventually leave Hawaii for the mainland, and on Jan. 24, 1985, he became the first Asian-American, the first Japanese-American, and the first Hawaiian in space as an astronaut on the space shuttle Discovery.

But even orbiting 212 miles above the earth’s surface, the islands never left him — he brought them up there in the form of freeze-dried Kona coffee.

A year later, on the particularly cold morning of Jan. 28, 1986, Onizuka embarked on his second spaceflight, except this time, he didn’t return. Seventy-three seconds after lifting off, the space shuttle Challenger broke apart after o-rings in the right rocket booster failed to seal in super-heated gasses.

Onizuka, as well as the six other astronauts on board, were lost. He was 39.

Hard Work and Determination

For those who knew him while he was an astronaut, two things about Onizuka are as clear now as they were two and a half decades ago. One: he loved his family — his wife, their two daughters, and both of their extended families back on the islands; and two: that he was a hard worker.

Onizuka was driven by a work ethic instilled in him by his parents and his desire for himself and the people around him to accomplish as much as they could, his friends say. That drive took him from the Big Island to the University of Colorado at Boulder, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering in June 1969, and a master’s in that same subject in December of that same year. In January of 1970, he entered active duty with the Air Force after finishing four years in the ROTC program at Boulder.

Learn more

Categories: Nerd News

Lane of Things “Classroom Theory” #MakerEducation

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 01:00

Awesome build + write-up from Team 704 (Sergio Cuenca, Lazar Gueorguiev, and Anthony Keung) up on Hackster.io.

Our group is trying to collect data on how long students are gone from class and for what reasons. The classroom that we deployed our box in hosts three different classes: AP Physics A, Honors Robotics 1, and Honors Robotics 2. We thought it would be interesting to see if there was a correlation between the perceived difficulty of the class, how often students leave the classroom, and how long they’re gone for.

During our brainstorming session, we figured that the four reasons students most often leave class for are: to go to the bathroom, get water, get something from their locker, or go on an errand for a teacher. From this point, we decided we would make a box that had a switch for each of those reasons. If a student were to leave the class, they would press the switch on, and when they came back they would turn it off. The photon would keep track of which switch they pressed, so that we know why they were gone, and we would know how long they’re gone for.

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Each Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

Categories: Nerd News

How to Join the Challenge to Detect Plastic on Beaches #CitizenScience #science #plastic #environment

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 00:30

When I was young my father used to say, “Nothing good was ever made out of plastic.” He was an engineer, and although back then he was responding to the issue of products breaking easily, he may have also been referring to the product chain. Now plastics are everywhere, and innovators and scientists are trying to figure out the best way to deal with them, especially those in the ocean. Of course some of the litter ends up on beaches, and that’s where Zooniverse’s newest challenge The Plastic Tide puts its focus. Here’s part of their intro message:

Estimates are currently at trillions of pieces and counting, with over 60% of the oceans being heavily contaminated with plastics. With each piece of plastic taking over 400 years to degrade, our oceans, all marine life, and even our own health and livelihoods are in real danger of drowning. Despite this and the 8 million tonnes of plastics entering our ocean each year, researchers can only account for where 1% of that it ends up; our ocean surface. That begs the question where is the missing 99%?

Drone photography of UK beaches is posted on the site and citizen scientists can identify the different types of plastic that appear. Strangely, the process of identifying bits of plastic in the photos is a lot like a mindful practice. This is partly because the photos resemble modern art with bits of sand, stones, shells and reeds. It’s also because the process really forces you to look closely at detail. The tools are easy to use including a cursor with a rectangle drag and pop-up menu choices. Some of the photo galleries turn up interesting compositions, like one with a skeleton of some marine life or another with tangles of fishing line. Although the photos are a disturbing recording of human intrusion, they also offer the chance to train a machine learning algorithm and identify the places that are most in need of help.

Although I’ve heard of successful beach clean-ups, this seems to be one of the best ways to really help the plastic pollution crisis. The people at The Plastic Tide have also decided to make things open-source. So, it’s possible that others could start posting images of their troubled beaches to add to the collection. If you want to learn more about the issue, check out the team’s description of the problem. I’m thinking this Zooniverse challenge might just be the perfect shore volunteer vacation option. Visit your fave shore by day and visit a virtual shore for a few hours by night. Be part of the changing tide.

Categories: Nerd News

Adding a Dash of VR to Class Is Possible with a Limited Budget #MakerEducation

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 00:00

Via EdTech Magazine.

Immersive virtual reality experiences offer powerful ways to engage students and create new learning opportunities in the classroom. As the technology and awareness about using VR in education continue to mature, so do the options available for teachers.

Google Expeditions remains one of the most well-known options for teachers to consider. With the Expeditions app, teachers can take students on “virtual reality field trips” visiting far-away museums and exploring ancient ruins or natural wonders like Mount Everest. 

Teachers can put together their own kids using less expensive cardboard viewers that cost $7-$10 each, as well as a tablet as a teacher device and, for the students, VR smartphone apps that can run on school Wi-Fi. Most smartphones purchased in the last three years will run VR apps and work with mobile VR headsets. Schools may also consider purchasing a set of Android phones or find a sponsor that may be able to donate new or refurbished devices for an initial VR project.

Read more.

Each Tuesday is EducationTuesday here at Adafruit! Be sure to check out our posts about educators and all things STEM. Adafruit supports our educators and loves to spread the good word about educational STEM innovations!

Categories: Nerd News

AdaBox: Now Shipping to Canada!

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 00:00

We’re excited to announce AdaBox is now officially shipping to Canada! A $10 shipping fee will be applied on orders shipping Canada. All orders to Canada will ship via DHL Express.

Subscribe now!

Fore more information on AdaBox, please see our FAQ here.

Categories: Nerd News

Artist combines art with beekeeping in living polyhedral beehive sculptures #ArtTuesday

AdaFruit - Tue, 05/02/2017 - 00:00

Via Treehugger

It’s been said that beekeeping is an art, treading a fine balance between knowledge of bee behaviour and the cycles of development of local plant life. Beijing-based Chinese artist and beekeeper Ren Ri combines this art with a mathematical bent, creating delicate polyhedral sculptures of plexiglass that house intricately constructed beehives.

Ren Ri, who began beekeeping only in 2008, explains on Cool Hunting why he chose this living medium:

Beeswax is a very special material; it’s unstable and can change shape with temperature. The structure of wax cells is orthohexagonal, which is an inconceivable feature in the natural world and it’s a peculiarity of honeybees. Another reason behind the choice of bees is that I wanted to try to eliminate the subjectivity of the artist and the mediation of bees served this purpose.

See more!

Categories: Nerd News

What Happens When Google Turns Artists Loose On Its Search Data #ArtTuesday

AdaFruit - Mon, 05/01/2017 - 23:00

Via Fast Co. Design

Data journalists work at the crossroads of reportage and visual creativity. They tell stories by shaping information like journalists do, but they communicate through visceral and compelling visuals. The same can be said of data artists, who emphasize the illustrative qualities of visualization over facts and numbers—but communicate stories in much the same way.

As the data journalist Alberto Cairo, who is partnering with Google News Lab on a new artist-focused initiative, puts it: “The people we are collaborating with have this dual approach. Some call themselves artists, but their approach is journalistic in the sense that they don’t try primarily to produce art as a vehicle for self-expression, but as a means to communicate ideas.”

Since 2015, Google News Lab has worked to make the company’s huge trove of Search data accessible to newsrooms. Most of the lab’s previous projects—such as the annual Year In Search that digs back through the year’s headline news, or initiatives to train journalists to incorporate data into their stories—introduce tools that make it easier to use data in news reporting. As Google News Lab data editor Simon Rogers points out, Google has access not only to a giant swath of data—but also to data that represents what people are really interested in, honestly and without agenda. Google doesn’t get its numbers by polling people or prompting them in any way; it simply pulls them from what people naturally search for.

“It takes you beyond the echo chamber of social media into what the world really thinks and cares about,” says Rogers.

Rogers and his team wondered what would happen if they handed over access to that data to designers and artists instead–and gave them total freedom to choose not only what to visualize, but how. In collaboration with Cairo, they turned to a different group of professionals to parse Google’s Search information: data artists.

Read more.

Every Tuesday is Art Tuesday here at Adafruit! Today we celebrate artists and makers from around the world who are designing innovative and creative works using technology, science, electronics and more. You can start your own career as an artist today with Adafruit’s conductive paints, art-related electronics kits, LEDs, wearables, 3D printers and more! Make your most imaginative designs come to life with our helpful tutorials from the Adafruit Learning System. And don’t forget to check in every Art Tuesday for more artistic inspiration here on the Adafruit Blog!
Categories: Nerd News

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